Book recommendations

Celebrate NAIDOC Week with a book

July 03, 2018

NAIDOC Week celebrates the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. For young children, a great way to discover, celebrate and learn more is through books.

Read on for some great titles to look for at your local library. While you’re there, check for NAIDOC activities held throughout the week.

Big Rain Coming

A lyrical story about waiting for the rain to come to an isolated Aboriginal community. Tension in the community builds as the rain clouds thicken and grow dark. Everybody waits. When will the rain come?

Anna the Goanna

Cheeky dogs, slippery snakes and crocodiles with big smiles join Anna in this collection of lively illustrated poems. With warmth and respect, we’re taken into the children’s lives as they camp under the stars, go hunting for tucker and play footy in the dust.

Anna the Goanna provides rare insight into the richly textured lives of contemporary Indigenous children. The poems are rhythmic and memorable, with a jaunty beat. They’re designed specially for school performances and presentations.

Wombat Stew

One day, on the banks of a billabong, a very clever dingo
caught a wombat… and decided to make…
Wombat stew,
Wombat stew,
Gooey, brewy,
Yummy, chewy,
Wombat stew!

In this classic Australian picture book, a dingo catches a wombat and wants to cook him in a stew. But all the other bush animals have a plan to save their friend. They trick the dingo into using mud, feathers, flies, bugs and gumnuts in his stew, and the result is something the dingo will never forget!

Sam’s Fishing Adventure

Grandfather’s adventures with his family, as a child living on a Torres Strait Island, are retold and brightly illustrated by a young student teacher. This simple book will delight and inform the younger generation.

Mad Magpie

Inspired by wise sayings and the knowledge of his Elders, Mad Magpie tells the story of Guluu, an angry magpie who is being teased by a gang of butcher birds. The more he is teased, the angrier he becomes. When Guluu seeks advice, his Elders tell him to stay calm like the river, ignore the butcher birds and to be strong on the inside. Guluu tries this, but the cheeky birds just laugh at him. One day, when Guluu is at the river looking for worms, the butcher birds arrive and steal his food. He remembers the words of his Elders and he tries again – and this time Guluu has a different outcome.

You and Me Murrawee

‘We walk this same brown earth – you and me, Murrawee . . . ‘ In this lyrical, beautifully observed picture book, we see through the eyes of a young girl camping on the river with her family, life as it would have been two hundred years ago.